The $ 415 million I-15 technology corridor project won the UDOT Award: CEG

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The Utah Department of Transportation won an AASHTO regional award for its work on I-15 Lehi Main at SR 92.

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) recently announced the top 12 finalists of the 2021 America’s Transportation Awards competetion.

Work on I-15 – known as the Technology Corridor – Lehi Main at SR 92, earned the Utah Department of Transportation the quality of life / community development selection in the competition. This project falls under the category of “large” projects in the competition as the work eclipsed more than $ 200 million in construction costs.

Sponsored by the AASHTO, AAA and the US Chamber of Commerce, the competition evaluates projects in three categories: Quality of Life / Community Development; Better use of technology and innovation; and Excellence in Operations. Projects are also divided into three sizes: small (projects costing up to $ 25 million); medium (projects costing between $ 26 million and $ 200 million); and large (over $ 200 million).

“While the past 18 months have brought so much uncertainty, one thing that has remained the same is the commitment of state DOTs to provide a safe and efficient multimodal transport system for our communities,” said the executive director of AASHTO Jim Tymon in a statement. “This competition recognizes just a few examples that highlight the ways in which state DOTs improve the quality of life and economic vitality of our communities, save time and money through new innovations and technologies, and make a difference. better use of assets already in place.

Project need

The rapid growth in Lehi has resulted in traffic jams along the I-15 corridor, affecting drivers and surrounding communities. To address this issue and prepare the region for continued growth, UDOT, with the help of teams of entrepreneurs, completed a $ 415 million project that reconfigured the I-15 and made multimodal improvements. . Thanks to an in-depth conceptual analysis and the collaboration of stakeholders with the business community, the public transport agency, the local municipality and land use planning authorities, the team has developed an active transport network with shared use trails parallel to front roads and safer crossings at SR 92, Triumph Boulevard and 2100. North. The trail system includes several structures to keep cyclists and pedestrians safe and separate from traffic. Now, all drivers and non-motorized commuters benefit from a safer, more connected transportation system that better serves the community.

“The Tech Corridor project was more than just a motor vehicle transportation project,” said Kim Struthers, director of community development for the town of Lehi. “On top of that, we now have a large looped cycle and pedestrian path on either side of the highway. This will make it easier to get to our employment center by alternative modes of transport. It will also serve recreational users and allow cyclists, joggers to connect to the extensive network of surrounding trails, including the Murdock Canal Trail, Jordan River Parkway Trail, and the Southern Rail Trail. Triumph Boulevard and State Street which make it much safer and more comfortable for people to cross the freeway and major arteries. “

Mitchell Shaw, director of communications for UDOT, said “the biggest challenge was to keep traffic going while another major north / south corridor in the region, US-89, was simultaneously under construction.”

“While the past 18 months have brought so much uncertainty, one thing that has remained the same is the commitment of state DOTs to provide a safe and efficient multimodal transport system for our communities,” said the executive director of AASHTO Jim Tymon in a statement. “This competition recognizes just a few examples that highlight the ways in which state DOTs improve the quality of life and economic vitality of our communities, save time and money through new innovations and technologies, and make a difference. better use of assets already in place.

The top 12 finalists – chosen from 80 nominees from 35 state DOTs through four US regional competitions – now compete for the grand prize and the People’s Choice Award. Both prizes are accompanied by a cash award of $ 10,000, for a charitable or transportation-related scholarship of the winners’ choice, according to the AASHTO.

Other finalists vying for the award include:

  • Arizona DOT – Fourth Street Bridge over Interstate 40 (Quality of Life / Community Development, Medium Project Group)
  • Delaware DOT – Margaret Rose Henry Bridge and Approach Roads (Operations Excellence, Medium Project group)
  • Florida DOT – Leveraging Innovation: How FDOT Transformed the Gateway to the Florida Keys (Best Use of Technology and Innovation, Small Projects Group)
  • Indiana DOT – Grand Valley Boulevard Bridge (Quality of life / community development, group of small projects)
  • Kansas DOT – Turner Diagonal: Partnership for Growth (Operations Excellence, Medium Project group)
  • Kentucky Transportation Cabinet – Brent Spence Bridge Emergency Repair Project (Operations Excellence, Small Project group)
  • New Jersey DOT – Route 1 Permanent Hard Shoulder Running Project (Operations Excellence, Small Project group)
  • North Carolina DOT – Reconstruction of Salem Parkway (US 421 / I-40 Business) (Quality of Life / Community Development, Medium Project group)
  • Oregon DOT – I-84 Snow Zone Safety Improvement Project (Operations Excellence, Small Project group)
  • Pennsylvania DOT – Ohiopyle Multimodal Gateway (Quality of life / community development, group of small projects)
  • South Carolina DOT – SC 61 Phase 1 (Rural Road Safety Program) (Operations Excellence, Small Project group)

The AASHTO will announce the grand prize winner and the People’s Choice Award winner at its annual meeting in San Diego, October 26-29.

“These final projects are just a small sampling of the many ways state DOTs make communities safer and support economic development,” Tymon said. DOTs implement projects and programs that create a more efficient transportation system for the movement of goods and services. ” CEG

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